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The Witcher 3 is one of the best war games there's ever been

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  • The Witcher 3 is one of the best war games there's ever been

    Just sharing an article with you about war in the Witcher 3. I thought it was insightful and well written.

    The Witcher 3 is one of the best war games there's ever been

    The thing that The Witcher 3 does best, better than most other games, is war. This doesn't sound remarkable until you consider the huge number of games that are specifically about war - that make you do war and be in it - and that war itself never appears in The Witcher, at least not directly. We see battlefields and garrisons, occupations and barricades, but never open conflict. War is in a constant state of passing through, enormous and unseen, always at some distant proximity, but written into the land of The Witcher 3 and the people on it, in magic and misery...
    He also goes on a tangent about Geralt has an homage to samurai that I'd never really considered.

    Geralt stands apart from the world and everyone in it, freed from impossible choices. He's a brilliant creation, the perfect body in which to tour the no-man's murk of Velen and beyond - a powerful, neutral force, like a wandering ronin. In fact bits of Geralt - his tied hair and long swords, his spinning fighting style and that wolfish look - are so reminiscent of Toshiro Mifune, the star of Akira Kurosawa's samurai films, that you get the feeling Mifune must have been in CD Projekt's minds as they built their version of Geralt.

  • #2
    Amazing article.

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    • #3
      That's what i love about Sapkowski, The Witcher is not only Medieval-Fantasy and so on...it also criticizes our Modern society and our Human behavior somehow!
      Morality, Humanity and all these Topics!
      Last edited by saltyB; 28-08-16, 17:25.
      "Sun is the same in a relative way but you'r older"

      #TeamCirilla

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      • #4
        good read

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        • #5
          "This doesn't sound remarkable until you consider the huge number of games that are specifically about war - that make you do war and be in it - and that war itself never appears in The Witcher, at least not directly."

          This is precisely what many people don't like of TW3. Me included. What's the point of living in a wartime and don't see even one battle? It's senseless. I would had enough just with a few skirmishes
          Last edited by Sam2305; 01-05-17, 17:50.

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          • #6
            TW 3 is indeed one of the best games ever written. Too bad we never get to see that war in-game. And that image in the article it is very...very old... or I never found that place in the game.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Sam2305
              "This doesn't sound remarkable until you consider the huge number of games that are specifically about war - that make you do war and be in it - and that war itself never appears in The Witcher, at least not directly."

              This is precisely what many people don't like of TW3. Me included. What's the point of living in a time of war and don't see even one battle? It's senseless. I would had enough just with a few skirmishes
              Well, I suppose the point is that the world feels lived-in and very much like one at war, and the human impact of the war is felt so strongly and richly that it trumps not witnessing soldiers actually fighting. Which is kind of the point of the article.

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              • #8
                Honestly a rather rambling piece that skips much of what makes TW3 a great commentary on war. Also, 11 Bit did an admirable job of it as well, and you won't read about that on Euro gamer.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sam2305 View Post
                  "This doesn't sound remarkable until you consider the huge number of games that are specifically about war - that make you do war and be in it - and that war itself never appears in The Witcher, at least not directly."

                  This is precisely what many people don't like of TW3. Me included. What's the point of living in a time of war and don't see even one battle? It's senseless. I would had enough just with a few skirmishes

                  So much this, the war is completly absent from the game and i would go even further as to claim that the game does a poor atempt to simulate one(sure the atmosphere is there, but it lacks any gameplay to go with it). Witcher 2 Chapter 2 did a far better atempt at it in my opinion.

                  There is a lot of talk of war in The Witcher 3, yet the communities still thrive as if nothing, peasants have abundance of supplies for us to loot, merchants have abundance of goods for us to buy, etc.
                  There is not even a single skirsmish during the whole game, not a blockade, not a siege, not an atack on a village, not a talk about spies sabotaging, nothing.

                  A lot of suspension of disbelief is needed for me to claim this is the best war game ever made.
                  Last edited by Yeiiow; 25-04-17, 01:03.

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                  • #10
                    The opening scene has the war...

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                    • #11
                      Witcher 2 also had a couple of active battlefields that you had to go through iirc.

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                      • #12
                        TBH it's pretty amazing that articles are still written about this game, 2 years after its realease.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by gregski View Post
                          TBH it's pretty amazing that articles are still written about this game, 2 years after its realease.
                          I fully expect that in 25 years, people will still be referring to it as a gold standard. It simply unified so many open-world elements so well and blended them so seamlessly into the overall experience. Not to mention mature, developed storylines, voice-acting, and cinematic execution -- it's a magical combo. I set it beside Ultima VII insofar as it incorporates and balances so many variables so expertly. I think, whether people love or hate the actual game, they can't deny the accomplishment.
                          People always ask me, "What's in the box?" I get the question a lot. "Come on -- what's in the box!?" I won't tell them...but I'll tell you. Go on.
                          You can see what's IN THE BOX!!!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by bengeddes View Post
                            He also goes on a tangent about Geralt has an homage to samurai that I'd never really considered.
                            Geralt stands apart from the world and everyone in it, freed from impossible choices. He's a brilliant creation, the perfect body in which to tour the no-man's murk of Velen and beyond - a powerful, neutral force, like a wandering ronin. In fact bits of Geralt - his tied hair and long swords, his spinning fighting style and that wolfish look - are so reminiscent of Toshiro Mifune, the star of Akira Kurosawa's samurai films, that you get the feeling Mifune must have been in CD Projekt's minds as they built their version of Geralt.
                            This is the message addressed to JP users from CDPR around 2 years ago:

                            TBH even from one Japanese viewpoint, I think identifying Geralt with samurai is not weird at all, rather comfortable to us.

                            By the way, an exhibition is currently held in Japan featuring Przemysław “Trust” Truściński who designed television and theatre sets and graphic projects for computer games (The Witcher, among others).
                            http://www.uplink.co.jp/gallery/2017/48944
                            I'm sure that just a few years ago, it would have been unthinkable to hold an exhibition in Japan. I'd say this happens because TW3 not only gained popularity in Japan as well but also is one of the best game which articles are still written about this game, 2 years after its realease.
                            Last edited by pinoko; 01-09-17, 20:24.

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                            • #15
                              pinoko, is there an English translation for the message you posted?

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