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How much should Cyberpunk 2077 cost on release date?

+

What should the downloadable version cost?

  • 40

  • 50

  • 60

  • 70

  • 80

  • 90

  • over 9000


Results are only viewable after voting.
my idea is that the:

  • Downloadable steam game should cost 80 euro
  • Hard copy with poster and a map 90 euro
  • Special edition in a nice box with a book 100 euro
  • And the special edition with Cyberpunk 2020 (or updated version for the 2077 world) 160 euro

The prices are a bit high but i believe.. if the game is non-stop the '48 min game-play' for hundreds of hours it is MORE then worth it.

What do you think the 'GAME OF THE NEXT DECADE' should cost? And share your thoughts :)
 
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my idea is that the:

  • Downloadable steam games should cost 80 euro
  • Hard copy with poster and a map 90 euro
  • Special edition in a nice box with a book 100 euro
  • And the special edition with Cyberpunk 2020 (or updated version for the 2077 world) 160 euro

The prices are a bit high but i believe.. if the game is non-stop the '48 min game-play' for hundreds of hours it is MORE then worth it.

What do you think the 'GAME OF THE NEXT DECADE' should cost? And share your thoughts :)
I'm down for paying $60 on release for a digital copy even in my country where $60 is a lot. I don't even want to translate what 80 Euros are in my currency. I think you're probably the only one who is willing to pay those prices.
 
Tripple A games are for to long 60 dollar and euro..
Super Mario 3 was 60 dollar on release.. in 1988...

don't you think it would be time to give the right amount of money for your game, so they don't have to rely on the 'standard' DLC's to break even or get some net. prof. ?
 
Tripple A games are for to long 60 dollar and euro..
Super Mario 3 was 60 dollar on release.. in 1988...

don't you think it would be time to give the right amount of money for your game, so they don't have to rely on the 'standard' DLC's to break even or get some net. prof. ?
Nope. If anything video games have been priced too high for far too long. More developers need to distance themselves from Publishers and go independent. Just look at what Ninja Theory was able to do with HellBlade. What a quality game for a reasonable price. Now let's look at what Compulsion Games did with 'We Happy Few'. This game started as an Indie AA game with much potential and a reasonable price. Unfortunately, it went on to become a bloated AAA game being published by Gearbox Software. Did the partnership with Gearbox help the game? Nope. The game is mediocre at best as most critics have pointed out. There will always be DLC. That's not something that will stop with increasing the price of the base game. There was a time to put a stop to DLC as we know it today, and that boat sailed a long, long time ago. Expansions are rare nowadays because it's like developing another game essentially and that requires more funding. Why would developers bother with that when you can easily milk your fanbase with "cut content" dlc.

CDPR is a polish developer. Development costs are lower in Poland than they are in the US. So their game should be cheaper than the average $60-70, not more expensive. As consumers, we should avoid making arguments like "I think it's time to pay more because it's worth it." In fact, it is your duty to find the most competitive price for the product we want to purchase and then purchase it legally. You don't have to make the "companies deserve more of our money" argument for them. They are already doing it without your help. Fortunately for us, CDPR still believes in being fair to the consumers. Otherwise, they'd charge $40 for each expansion they put out for TW3. And god knows those expansions were lengthy! Enough to be standalone games. That doesn't mean, however, that you should feel overzealously generous. That kind of thinking is critically bad for consumers no matter how good your intentions are.
 
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Nope. If anything video games have been priced too high for far too long. More developers need to distance themselves from Publishers and go independent. Just look at what Ninja Theory was able to do with HellBlade. What a quality game for a reasonable price. Now let's look at what Compulsion Games did with 'We Happy Few'. This game started as an Indie AA game with much potential and a reasonable price. Unfortunately, it went on to become a bloated AAA game being published by Gearbox Software. Did the partnership with Gearbox help the game? Nope. The game is mediocre at best as most critics have pointed out. There will always be DLC. That's not something that will stop with increasing the price of the base game. There was a time to put a stop to DLC as we know it today, and that boat sailed a long, long time ago. Expansions are rare nowadays because it's like developing another game essentially and that requires more funding. Why would developers bother with that when you can easily milk your fanbase with "cut content" dlc.

CDPR is a polish developer. Development costs are lower in Poland than they are in the US. So their game should be cheaper than the average $60-70, not more expensive. As consumers, we should avoid making arguments like "I think it's time to pay more because it's worth it." In fact, it is your duty to find the most competitive price for the product you want to purchase and then purchase it legally. You don't have to make the "companies deserve more our money" argument for them. They are already doing it with or without your help. Fortunately for us, CDPR still believes in being fair to the consumers. Otherwise, they'd charge $40 for each expansion they put out for TW3. And god knows those expansions were lengthy! Enough to be standalone games. That doesn't mean, however, that you should feel overzealously generous. That kind of thinking is critically bad for consumers.
good arguments.
i am not one for long post so i will keep it short (like i always do)
"competitive price" is hard when you have nothing to compare it with (seller point of view)
I think DLC must come out of love for the game and fanbase and should be free. it gives a lot of 'goodwill' (economic term) that is worth a ton to the company and next games.
Expansions are.. something else.. if it gives 50% more then it should cost half of the main game... although the production cost would be much lower i think that is reasonable.
the rest i agree with.. it looks a bit contradictory and probably is.. but that is the way i see it :)
 
$60 is fine. Given the quality we've already seen, it's well worth that much, at least. Arguing that because an arbitrary time has passed we should increase video game prices on games we like is a signal to more predatory companies like Activision, Ubisoft, and EA that we're willing to pay more money for their games. Frankly, I think the quality of many games has finally caught up to that $60 mark we've been sold at for so long, not that games are now somehow worth more.

We should encourage and reward quality games by paying full price, but we as consumers also have a responsibility to not overpay for a game and open it up to even less scrupulous practices.
 
This always amuses me.

Game 20 hours. 60 dollars. That's 3 dollars per hour - pretty good actually, compared to an album for $10 or a Movie for $15.

Game 40 hours. 60 dollars. Even better!

Game 100 hours. 60 dollars. Amazing.

Game 200 hours. 60 dollars. Suspiciously good - but still the time I put into Witcher 3 on my first pass.

Nearly the only media where you can get multiples of quantity and expect the same price.

Try getting five novels for the price of one. Or 5 movies. 5 albums.

Sure, a big book vs a small book, same price. But Witcher 3 has -multiples- of the content of , say, Doom 2016.

And yet - same price.

Hilarious.
 
In euro? I am not going to pay much more than 28 euros (for a DVD edition), especially when I haven't yet seen anything worth that price tag.
 
Not sure what that is in Kiwi dollars, but I'm fine with whatever provided that it's in line with the current exchange rate. Too many publishers charge us an extra $20 'because Oceania'. :mad:
 
This always amuses me.

Game 20 hours. 60 dollars. That's 3 dollars per hour - pretty good actually, compared to an album for $10 or a Movie for $15.

Game 40 hours. 60 dollars. Even better!

Game 100 hours. 60 dollars. Amazing.

Game 200 hours. 60 dollars. Suspiciously good - but still the time I put into Witcher 3 on my first pass.

Nearly the only media where you can get multiples of quantity and expect the same price.

Try getting five novels for the price of one. Or 5 movies. 5 albums.

Sure, a big book vs a small book, same price. But Witcher 3 has -multiples- of the content of , say, Doom 2016.

And yet - same price.

Hilarious.
Except we're seeing a lot of games that are pricing themselves based on content or quality more recently, rather than based on the standard $60 price tag. Granted, a lot of these are indy developers, so take that how you will. However, I would be more willing to fish out more than $60 if publishers like EA didn't routinely pass off half a game for $60 with day one DLC for the other half, or even quarter. And leave all the lovely bugs to crawl around for months because they couldn't bother to do a decent beta, and don't really care if the game fails in the long run.

It sucks that good publishers who actually seem to do the right thing get hurt, but consumers have a right to protect themselves from shit practices by less respectable studios, because you know that if they see a successful game outside the price point, they'll try that shit themselves. Aside from that, you can't say that CDPR somehow lost money making TW3, considering how ridiculously successful it was, is, and continues to be.
 
It sucks that good publishers who actually seem to do the right thing get hurt, but consumers have a right to protect themselves from shit practices by less respectable studios, because you know that if they see a successful game outside the price point, they'll try that shit themselves. Aside from that, you can't say that CDPR somehow lost money making TW3, considering how ridiculously successful it was, is, and continues to be.
It would have been successful if it had been 30. Also probably 90. Quality shows.

My point is more the expectation of vast quantity - and quality - for the same price as an average of those things.

Take Mankind Divided - obviously 1/3 of a story - really a long first chapter. Disappointing in that sense, you bet.

But the price tag for the quantity and quality was more than fair.

I'm not sure to what EA games you refer, or why $60 is the standard by which we judge these, but I will say that using a per-hour entertainment value, video games are very very good value.

And that's before replays, much demanded by consumers, come into that valuation.
 
Not sure what that is in Kiwi dollars, but I'm fine with whatever provided that it's in line with the current exchange rate. Too many publishers charge us an extra $20 'because Oceania'. :mad:
1 euro is 1 bread or one liter of milk.. more or less.
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We should encourage and reward quality games by paying full price, but we as consumers also have a responsibility to not overpay for a game and open it up to even less scrupulous practices.
that is why game reviews on YouTube are so popular nowadays.
 
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You could also make the movie comparison with a service like Netflix. We are in 2018 afterall, not early 2000's when DVD's were still actually a thing. So assuming a healthy 8 hours per day of sleep you are left with an average of 486 hours (rounded down) monthly watch time for 13.99€ at the highest price. Thats 2.9 cents per hour.

The quality of the game is ofcourse very important. Thats why I didn't have a problem paying 20€ for my 7.5 hours in Hellblade. (A real masterpiece btw.) But there is also a sort of a price cap that I'm willing to pay for things. In my life I've paid 60€ for a game exactly once. (Diablo 3 and about 2500 hours of multiplayer fun)
However for a single player game... 50€ is pretty much the cap. But feel free to make special editions with all sorts of extra out of the game goodies so people who want to support for more than 50€ can do so.
 
It will probably be 60 on release, with some discount for pre-ordering. There is no particular reason to change the pricing strategy compared to The Witcher 3.

By the way, I do not like the "hours per dollar" metric, just because a game is longer, it is not necessarily "better". Not all games have the same pacing, and I am not sure if the time spent on crafting, grinding and item hunts in an open world game is worth more as an experience than, say, the entirety of Portal 2, only because it took longer.
 
I'd just go with 60€ as that's more or less the pricing standard.
Somewhat sure the prices you suggested would scare some potential buyers away, considering that other big titles cost quite a bit less. At least regarding the prices for the download & hardcopy editions. If you're gonna buy the special edition(s), you're really excited for the game anyway.
 
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